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Information and Resources

Vaux’s Swift

Chapman School in Northwest Portland houses the largest known roost of migrating swifts in the world! Hundreds of bird watchers visit the school during September to watch up to 35,000 Vaux Swifts swarm into the chimney at dusk. Read more...

Band-tailed Pigeon

Our native pigeon is a lovely, soft gray color with a gracefully-shaped body that is longer and sleeker than that of a Rock Dove (a.k.a. city pigeon). Band-tailed Pigeons will readily come to an open, platform feeder offering millet, cracked corn and sunflower chips. They'll come to any feeder offering those food choices, as long as the feeder is large and stable enough to accommodate these relatively large backyard birds. Read more...

American Goldfinch

Chances are good that the bright flash of yellow you see in your back yard is a male American Goldfinch. This gregarious 5" bird can be seen all across America, along roadsides, in open woods and fields, farm and suburban yards. Read more...

Black-headed Grosbeak

Black-headed Grosbeaks are striking summer residents throughout much of the western U.S. Read more...

Chestnut-backed Chickadee

The Chestnut-backed species is a conifer lover and, true to its name, has a distinctive chestnut-colored back. Its primary range is the Pacific Northwest. Read more...

Turkey Vulture

While some would argue that Turkey Vultures are unattractive up close, their large size and graceful flight make them a beautiful addition to Oregon’s summer skies. Read more...

Western Tanager

Although Western Tanagers (Piranga ludoviciana) are brilliantly colored and nest across much of the western United States and Canada, they can be hard to see most of the time. They nest in mountain forests and tend to stay hidden in the shade. During spring migration, however, these colorful birds become a common sight in yards, parks, and bird baths throughout the Willamette Valley. Read more...

Bushtits in Spring

Male and female Bushtits pair up for nesting season now, working together to build a stretchy sac-like nest using materials like spider webs, plant fiber, feathers and fur. Their elaborate nests can take over a month to build. Bushtits are monogamous, but one or two more adults may help the couple raise their young. Read more...

Swallow Family

Whether you are looking out over a river, a wetland, a residential lawn, or a parking lot, it is not hard to see swallows on any summer day. These graceful fliers spend much of their time on the wing, speeding through the air as they catch flying insects. They even drink and bathe while flying. Read more...

Rufous Hummingbird

In March we welcome Rufous Hummingbirds, who fly up to 3,000 miles from their wintering grounds to join us in the northwest. Read more...

Hummingbird Tongues - Tiny Elastic Pumps

Photo of Anna's Hummingbird by Steve Berliner Hummingbirds' skinny tongues are about the same length as their bills, perfectly adapted for reaching deep into a flower. For over 180 years, scientists believed that to drink nectar, hummingbirds relied on capillary action. The idea was that their tongues would fill with nectar in the same way a small glass tube fills passively with water. Last month the Washington Post reported on a scientist from Columbia, a country rich in hummingbirds, who realized that a hummingbird can drain an entire flower of its nectar in under a second, a process much too quick for capillary action. Read more...

Warblers

Among the most beautiful birds in the Western Hemisphere are the wood warblers. These tiny birds appear in a dazzling array of yellows, blues, greens, reds, and grays Read more...

Pine Siskin

If you see a small, heavily streaked finch at your nyjer or sunflower feeder, aggressively spreading its tail and wings, you're likely watching the antics of a Pine Siskin as it tries to intimidate the other birds at the feeder! These scrappy 5-inch birds often forage in large flocks, and seem quite adept at vying for the best perch on a nyjer or black oil sunflower feeder! Read more...

Bushtits

They'll swarm your suet feeder as they gregariously chatter with one another! Read more...

Tips on Hosting Nesting Birds

Whether your yard is urban, suburban, or rural, you can encourage nesting birds to take up residence. Food, water, and a sheltered nesting site are the essentials. Here are some tips to increase your likelihood of success: Read more...

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