Connect with Nature!

 
Information and Resources

Our August Birdbath Sale!

Save 20% on any in-stock birdbath from August 15 - 31, 2015! August is the perfect time of the year to add water to your backyard habitat! Shop now to enjoy the best selection and prices of the year! Read more...

Warblers

Among the most beautiful birds in the Western Hemisphere are the wood warblers. These tiny birds appear in a dazzling array of yellows, blues, greens, reds, and grays Read more...

Pine Siskin

If you see a small, heavily streaked finch at your nyjer or sunflower feeder, aggressively spreading its tail and wings, you're likely watching the antics of a Pine Siskin as it tries to intimidate the other birds at the feeder! These scrappy 5-inch birds often forage in large flocks, and seem quite adept at vying for the best perch on a nyjer or black oil sunflower feeder! Read more...

Swallow Family

Whether you are looking out over a river, a wetland, a residential lawn, or a parking lot, it is not hard to see swallows on any summer day. These graceful fliers spend much of their time on the wing, speeding through the air as they catch flying insects. They even drink and bathe while flying. Read more...

Bushtits

They'll swarm your suet feeder as they gregariously chatter with one another! Read more...

Rufous Hummingbird

In March we welcome Rufous Hummingbirds, who fly up to 3,000 miles from their wintering grounds to join us in the northwest. Read more...

Tips on Hosting Nesting Birds

Whether your yard is urban, suburban, or rural, you can encourage nesting birds to take up residence. Food, water, and a sheltered nesting site are the essentials. Here are some tips to increase your likelihood of success: Read more...

“Saving” that Baby Bird

It is spring, so Audubon Society of Portland’s Wildlife Care Center will soon be very busy handling the “huddled masses” of baby animals that find themselves at their doorstep. Often well-meaning backyard bird enthusiasts mistakenly believe they’re helping a baby bird in trouble, when less interference would be the best course of action. Read more...

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrows are found throughout North America, but with up to 30 different subspecies, this bird may look different wherever you travel. Visitors from other parts of the country often confuse the local Song Sparrows with Fox Sparrows, but Fox Sparrows are larger. With a little practice, you will learn to recognize Song Sparrows by their distinctive, and beautiful, call note. Read more...

Nuthatches—Acrobats in Your Backyard!

Nuthatches are the only birds in our area who are equally adept at going either direction on a tree trunk, upward or downward. Ornithologists believe that nuthatches find insect food by going down a tree trunk that would be missed by birds going up the tree trunk, so the nutty behavior is really an evolutionary advantage. Read more...

Spotted Towhee

You may hear this bird before you see it! If you hear scratching and rustling noises coming from leaf litter or a birdfeeding area, you may be hearing a Spotted Towhee. Try to get a peek, because it's a beautiful backyard bird! Read more...

Fall Feeder Traffic Highlights

Migratory sparrows, mixed flocks of songbirds, and Anna's Hummingbirds .... Read more...

The Birds of Autumn

Autumn signals time to say “goodbye” to many fascinating birds that migrate to warmer climates. Gone until spring are Rufous Hummingbirds, Vaux Swifts, Barn, Violet Green and Tree Swallows, and many American Robins. They’ve migrated south because the supply of nectar and insects diminishes in a Pacific Northwest winter. Autumn is also a time to say “hello” to birds that migrate to the Pacific Northwest in search of seeds and soft ground for probing. Read more...

Vaux’s Swift

Chapman School in Northwest Portland houses the largest known roost of migrating swifts in the world! Hundreds of bird watchers visit the school during September to watch up to 35,000 Vaux Swifts swarm into the chimney at dusk. Read more...

What Seeds Seed Lovers Love

It’s true, black oil sunflower seed is the best choice for attracting the widest variety of birds. It's also true that going beyond black oil sunflower may bring new “diners” to your feeders. Here’s a tip: one type of seed per feeder reduces waste and mess. Birds rifle through seed mixes, dropping everything but their favorite. Another tip: don't buy "wild bird seed mixes" with stuff in them that Portland area birds won't eat -- like milo, for example. Backyard Bird Shop takes pride in offering the cleanest, freshest seeds you can buy for the best price you can find them! Read more...

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